Perennials, Herbs, and Other Heirloom Plants


If you have purchased our garden plants, read here to learn more about your new babies!

Artemisia: Grow artemisia for the magnificent silver foliage that complements nearly all other perennials and ties together diverse colors within the garden. They’re nothing short of stunning next to white or blue flowers. They thrive in hot, dry, sunny conditions such as a south-facing slope. Grows 1-3 feet wide and 1-3 feet tall.

Artemisia

Artemisia


Black-eyed Susan:
Add a pool of sunshine to the garden with a massed planting of black-eyed Susan. From midsummer, these tough native plants bloom their golden heads off in sun or light shade and mix well with other perennials, annuals, and shrubs. Tall varieties look especially appropriate among shrubs, which in turn provide support. Add black-eyed Susans to wildflower meadows or native plant gardens for a naturalized look. Average soil is sufficient for black-eyed Susans, but it should be able to hold moisture fairly well. These flowers love sunny locations, and they grow about 1ft wide and 1-3ft tall.

Black Eyed Susan

Black Eyed Susan


Chamomile:
Chamomile’s dainty daisy-like blooms glisten when dew-spangled and glow in moonlight. German chamomile is a bushy beauty that’s a favorite among bees and butterflies. Tucked into flower beds, it offers season-long color. Chamomile blooms brew a soothing tea that can help you sleep. The tea has also been shown to help control diabetes and its antibacterial properties make it great for colds or to use on skin. Toss fresh blossoms over salad, or use fresh or dried leaves to season butter, cream sauce, or sour cream. Likes part-sun or sun. Grows 3-18 inches wide and 1-3 feet tall.

Chamomile

Chamomile


Chives:
Chives grace the garden with bright green stems and pinkish-purple pom-pom blooms — all of which offer a distinctly mild onion flavor. We also sell garlic chives which are similar but have more of a garlic flavor instead of onion. Chives are also nutrient-rich and can boost the immune system. Versatile and easy-growing, chives thrive in containers and also form an eye-catching edging in planting beds. Place chives with convenient harvest in mind; a pot near the kitchen door keeps garden-fresh flavors close at hand. After chives flower, cut plants to encourage new growth, trimming a portion of the clump at a time. In wintry regions, as the growing season winds down, dig up a few bulbs to tuck in a pot for on a sunny windowsill. Prefers part sun or sun. Grows 12 inches wide and 1-2 feet tall.

Chives

Chives


Corkscrew Willow:
The corkscrew willow tree earned its name thanks to its unique branching habit. As the tree grows, its branches reach out horizontally and then twist this way and that, creating curls or corkscrews. This gives the corkscrew willow four season interest in the home garden. In the spring, it has lovely buds. In the summer, its graceful leaves and fast growing habit provide shade. During the fall, the leaves turn a bright, almost pure yellow color before dropping to the ground. Winter allows the corkscrew willow’s wonderful branches and intricate shapes to be seen against a backdrop of bright blue winter sky or white snow cover. Our corkscrew willows are sold bare-rooted. Like other willows, this plant creates its own rooting hormone, so it roots quickly when placed in a bucket of water. You can keep your baby willow tree in water for a while to let it keep growing roots, or you can plant it in the ground immediate by digging a hole large enough to contain and then covering the roots with soil. It prefers moist soil. It isn’t particularly fussy about its soil and can grow equally as well in clay, loam or sand. It can grow in sunny or partly shady areas. The leaves on the plant might die back after it’s planted but don’t worry. The willow is focusing on growing roots. Give it time and plenty of water, and it should bounce back and start to grow leaves again. Because it likes moisture, water this tree during periods of drought. Corkscrew willows are fast growing and reach a height of about 30 feet.

Corkscrew Willow

Corkscrew Willow


Daylily:
Native to Ohio, daylilies are so easy to grow you’ll often find them growing in ditches and fields. And yet they look so delicate, producing glorious trumpet-shape orange. The flowers are borne on leafless stems and each bloom lasts but a single day. Daylilies are fully edible and have been foraged for hundreds of years – the leaf shoots, tubers, and flowers can all be eaten and are delectable to most people. On the other hand, some people are allergic to these and eating the plant can have a laxative affect, so eat at your own risk! Also, many hybrid day lilies are not edible like the original, so be careful of what you eat. Daylilies are happiest in full sun. Grows 1-3 feet wide and 2-5 feet tall.

Daylily

Daylily


Euphorbia: 
(Also called “Spurge”) Euphorbias are easy to grow perennial plants that are tough and have few problems. Popular for their richly colored leaves and unusual flowers, euphorbias are an excellent addition to borders, rock gardens, meadows and more. Euphorbias in general are sun lovers, though some will tolerate partial shade. Grows up to 1 foot wide and up to 1 foot tall.

Euphorbia

Euphorbia


Ferns: 
Unique foliage textures abound in these classic woodland and shade garden favorites. All prefer moist soil. They thrive in open or dappled shade. All ferns grow best in soils with a high organic matter content. Few plants impart such a light, airy, cooling effect, or provide such a range of textures for the garden as Ferns. Our ferns grow in upright clumps to 2-3 feet high and 12 to 30 inches wide.

Ferns

Ferns


Forget-Me-Nots: Charming, diminutive forget-me-nots are delicate plants with beautiful little blue flowers. Forget-me-nots are excellent in pots, as edgings, and planted close as a groundcover. These short-lived plants, mostly treated as biennials, reseed generously. The flowers have colorful, tiny yellow eyes and bloom in spring and into early summer. Grows in sun or shade. Grows up to 1 foot wide and up to 1 foot tall.

Forget-me-not

Forget-me-not


Hens & Chicks:
These classic succulents are great for pots – I have them all over the yard. I hardly ever have to water them like you do with most potted plants that wilt in the summer heat. Succulents store water in their leaves and can live with little water. These plants stay small (2 to 3 inches tall) and spread in clumps, with small “chicks” growing out from a larger central “hen.” These plants are very easy to care for, very hardy, and easy to divide. They like full sun or part shade. All of my hens are descendants from my grandma’s plants so that makes them extra special to me.

hens-and-chicks

Hens and Chicks


Hostas:
Hostas are the ultimate shade plant! They demand little of you besides a bit of shade and they’ll come back year after year. Hosta foliage comes in a variety of colors and textures that add interest to a shady area, and all of the hostas that we have will make purple or white flowers in the late summer. Our “dark green” hostas have rich green leaves and light purple flowers. They grow to about 15 inches tall. Our “variegated” hostas have multicolored leaves and purple flowers, also growing to about 15 inches tall. Our “really big” hosta sends up shoots of white flowers that get up to 3 feet tall and it has wide leaves. (I’m not sure of the technical names of any of our hostas but I can tell you what they look like!)

Hosta

Dark Green Hosta


Iris (Siberian): 
The Iris was named after the Greek goddess who is considered to be the messenger of love and uses the rainbow to travel. The iris probably has second place as the favored flower in great art, after the rose, which is surely number one. Plant the rhizomes near the surface with the roots below. Iris plants are easy to grow in sun or partially shade, and you’ll welcome their elegant blooms in the late spring to early summer. Iris spreads in clumps and can spread up to 24-36 inches over the years, if you leave them to their own devices. Siberian iris grow to about 16 inches tall.

Iris

Iris


Lamb’s Ear:
Lamb’s ear is a top pick for a groundcover in a hot, baked spot. Its silver felted foliage quickly forms a dense, delightful mat. It also contrasts nicely with other foliage and most flowers. enhances almost everything. And honeybees love the flowers! This plant also has very high antibacterial and anti-microbial properties making it great for healing wounds. The large soft leaves can be used as a natural bandage. Historically, Lambs Ear herb was used to help reduce swelling of injured or inflamed joints and muscles and was gathered when the plant was in flower and dried for later use. This plant was often transported from home to home traveling across the country with the early settlers and pioneers. It is sometimes found growing wild in places where log cabins used to stand. The softness and size of Lamb’s Ear leaves make it a perfect toilet paper alternative plus when fully dried the leaves can be used as tinder for fire making. Lamb’s ear likes sunny or part sun. Grow 12-36 inches wide and 12-24 inches tall.

Lambs Ear

Lambs Ear


Lemon Balm
: Lemon balm’s quilted green leaves release a delicious lemony aroma when brushed, making it the perfect fragrant addition to plantings near patios and garden benches. Low-maintenance lemon balm thrives in beds or containers, as long as roots sink into well-drained soil. Bees can’t resist this bushy beauty, so be sure to tuck it in a garden where you grow vegetables and fruits that need pollinating. Trim plants after flowering to limit seeds and subsequent self-sown volunteers. Take advantage of lemon balm’s scent as an insect deterrent — toss a few stems onto a hot grill to drive away mosquitoes. This plant is also considered a calming herb. It was used as far back as the Middle Ages to reduce stress and anxiety, promote sleep, improve appetite, and ease pain and discomfort from indigestion (including gas and bloating, as well as colic). Lemon balm does well in partial sun or full sun. Grows 1-3 feet wide and 1-2 feet tall.

Lemon Balm

Lemon Balm


Lilac Bush: 
A longtime favorite, the lilac bush is typically grown for its intense fragrance and beautiful blooms. They can add a good source of shade or privacy when planted as a hedgerow. Lilacs With proper lilac tree care, these lovely plants can last decades in your garden. Choose an area with plenty of afternoon sun and well-drained soil. Since lilacs prefer good drainage, planting lilac bushes in slightly elevated areas is recommended whenever possible. Since lilacs are considered low-maintenance shrubs, the general care of lilac bushes is minimal, with exception to regular pruning. Lilacs grow to a maximum of 25 feet, though it’s typically 15 to 20 feet tall and about 15 feet wide. It can be pruned to stay smaller if desired.

Lilac

Lilac

Lily-Of-The-Valley: How can such a tiny flower give off such a tremendous scent? Tiny lily-of-the-valley sends up its lovely little sprays of bell-like white flowers each spring. Allow it to spread a little (which it does) and it will perfume the whole area with its distinctive scent. It also makes adorable, tiny bouquets. It makes a good deer-resistant groundcover in small areas. Lily-of-the-valley prefers shade and moist soil. In sunny or dry conditions, its leaves will brown. Grows 6-12 inches wide and 6 inches high.

Lily-Of-The-Valley

Lily-Of-The-Valley


Marjoram:
Sweet marjoram, a low-growing plant native to the Mediterranean, makes a pretty summer groundcover or edging. A subtly colored plant, marjoram has thin, gray-green leaves and, in early summer, small knot-like flowers along the stem ranging in color from lilac to white. It grows well in the garden or in containers, and you can plant a nice kitchen window box using marjoram with parsley, basil, and summer annuals. Marjoram is a very useful herb, as it keeps its full flavor even when dried. In order to dry marjoram, pick the leaves just after flower buds appear but before they open, removing no more than a third of the plant’s leaves in a single harvest. Once the leaves have dried, strip them from the stem. You may harvest again when flower buds reappear later in the season. Sweet marjoram, used lightly at the end of the cooking process, adds a nice, mellow, citrus-pine flavor to vegetables such as spinach, beans, peas, and carrots. It is good in salads and herbed butters, as well as in vinaigrettes. It is also traditionally used to treat a variety of sleep problems and colds. Marjoram likes full or part sun and grows 1 to 2 feet wide and up to 16 inches tall.

Sweet Marjoram

Sweet Marjoram


Mint:
Mint has multiple uses. Its fresh green leaves add a tangy punch to fruit salads, ice cream, sherbet, and brewed hot tea. It is a low-calorie, flavorful addition to a simple glass of still or sparkling water. And who ever heard of a mint julep without the mint? Mint is a great appetizer or palate cleanser, and it promotes digestion. It also soothes stomachs in cases of indigestion or inflammation. When you feel sick to your stomach, drinking a cup of mint tea can give you relief. Because it grows by underground root runners, mint spreads easily and quickly. To contain it, grow mint in a 12- to 16-inch-wide pot so it can’t ramble through your landscape. If you like, tuck the container into the ground so the pot doesn’t show but still keeps the herb in check. Plant mint in full sun or part shade. It thrives in rich, moist, well-drained soil. Mint adapts to many soil types, but develops the best foliage in soil that has been enriched with a 2-inch-thick layer of compost. Frequent cutting keeps mint looking attractive. As with basil and other flowering herbs grown for their leaves, remove flowers as they appear, and pinch back the stems to encourage shorter, bushier growth. Keep the area around mint free of weeds and grass. Otherwise it looks untidy, and the weeds may reduce yields and affect flavor. Mint grows up to 2 feet tall.

Mint Leaves

Mint Leaves


Oregano:
Savor true Italian flavor with garden-fresh oregano. This sprawling perennial herb pumps up the taste in tomato sauces, pizza, and Mediterranean cuisine. Oregano is an important culinary and medicinal herb that has been used in medicine and cooking for thousands of years – with a number of potential health benefits due to its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. An easy-growing perennial, oregano thrives in planting beds or containers. Plant it in a pot with rosemary, sage, and thyme for a flavorful quartet you can place near the kitchen door, handy for snipping and sprinkling into dishes. In the ground, plants will flower and set seed, which shortens the harvest season. Pinch flowers from stems to keep plants in top snipping form. Oregano prefers full sun. Grows 2-4 feet wide and 1-2 feet tall.

Oregano

Oregano


Pineapple Sage:
Pineapple Sage (a.k.a Pineapple Mint) has beautiful variegated leaves with a light minty sage flavor and tropical fruit aromas. It is a fantastic addition to drinks, salads, yogurts, meats and grains. Spectacular in Caribbean and Polynesian dishes. Like all sages, it has medicinal properties aiding in digestion which makes it a great tea and after dinner drink. Pineapple sage loves to spread very wide if left to its own devices and will grow up to 1-2 feet tall. 

Pineapple Sage

Pineapple Sage


Prairie Sage:
This plant is hard to find in Ohio and is native to prairie lands out West. This plant is traditionally harvested to make smudge sticks to burn for purifying and cleansing smoke. Prairie sage thrives in full sun and spreads through runners. Harvest the stems before the flower buds open and let them dry before you make bundles for smudging. It also has strong antibacterial properties and is traditional used to treat wounds. Prairie sage will spread very wide if left to its own devices and will grow up to 2-3 feet tall.

Prairie Sage Smudge Sticks

Prairie Sage Smudge Sticks


Rose of Sharon:
Rose of Sharon is a deciduous shrub that produces gorgeous hibiscus-like colorful, cup-shaped flowers in summer and fall. Rose of Sharon flowers in late summer to fall when few other shrubs are in bloom. I have both pink and white Rose of Sharon shrubs, so your new plant could be either color. This is an easy, low-maintenance plant. Select a site with full sun to light shade and moist, well-drained soil. Space plants 6 to 10 feet apart if you are planting a hedge. Flowers are produced on new wood, so prune in early spring to shape and reduce size. Pruning the shrub back to 2 to 3 buds per branch in spring encourages larger flowers. Remove dead, diseased, and injured branches any time. This plant will reseed itself somewhat profusely, so I recommend planting it by itself in an area where you can mow around it (as opposed to in a flower bed, where you’ll be over-run by baby Rose of Sharons in no time). Rose of Sharon is fast growing and can grow 8 to 12 feet tall and 6 to 10 feet wide.

Rose Of Sharon

Rose Of Sharon

 

Sedum, Autumn Joy: Sedums are nearly the perfect plants. They look good from the moment they emerge from the soil in spring and continue to look fresh and fabulous all growing season long. They are attractive even in winter when their foliage dies and is left standing. They’re also drought-tolerant and need very little if any care. They’re favorites of butterflies and useful bees. They are outstanding for cutting and drying. Does it get better than that? The Autumn Joy variety of sedum provides long-lasting color in late summer / early fall when most summer flowers are done blooming. They thrive in full sun with good drainage. Autumn Joy grows 1-2 feet wide and 1-2 feet tall.

Autumn Joy Sedum

Autumn Joy Sedum


Valerian:
This upright perennial herb, also called garden heliotrope, is topped with white to pinkish-white fragrant flowers in midsummer. The blooms were once used in perfume production. Cats also find the plant attractive and may rub against the foliage as they do with catnip. Valerian attracts butterflies to the garden. The roots of this plant are the main ingredient of Valium, and you can use the roots to make a strong sleepy time tea! Remove spent flowers to prevent the plant from self-sowing. Likes full sun or part sun. Grows 1-2 feet wide and 3-8 feet tall.

Valerian

Valerian


Yarrow: 
Yarrow is a hardy perennial with showy flower heads composed of many tiny, tightly-packed flowers. Their fern-like leaves are often aromatic. Yarrows are easy to care for and versatile: they are good for borders, rock gardens, or wildflower meadows. These flowers are excellent for cutting or drying. Our white yarrow makes a great groundcover, spreading densely and sending up white flowers in early summer. The above ground parts are used to make medicine. Yarrow is used for fever, common cold, hay fever, absence of menstruation, dysentery, diarrhea, loss of appetite, gastrointestinal (GI) tract discomfort, and to induce sweating. Some people chew the fresh leaves to relieve toothache.

White Yarrow

White Yarrow